Tag: disability

Bullying: Students – Parents – Teachers

bullying bystanders

To the parents, students, teachers, bullying targets and bystanders, I ask you if this story applies to any of you? If it does, please change your thinking now. Please!

There were 500 students in a school. They all had similar names.  Some of them were named Everybody. Some of them were named Somebody. Some were named Anybody and some were named Nobody.

When the students, teachers and parents found out that there was bullying going on in the school, Everybody was sure that Somebody would do something about it.

Anybody could have helped the situation but Nobody did.

Somebody got angry about the bullying going on because it was up to Everybody to do something to help the kids being bullied but Nobody did.

Everybody did absolutely nothing because they thought that Anybody could have helped to solve the problem.

Everybody thought that Anybody would help.

Nobody realized that Everybody would do nothing to help.

As it happened, Everybody blamed Somebody when Nobody did what Anybody could have done to stop the bullying.

Photo by coltrane004

Rugby Jones’ Mom Claudia Broome

Hi! My name is Claudia and I have a dog named Rugby Jones. I guess that makes me his human mom. Rugby has become my inspiration and my teacher because of the way that he has dealt with adversity in his life.

Rugby suffered a spinal cord injury and lost the use of his back legs. I watched the sadness in his eyes with an understanding that he could no longer run, play or even walk. Like any parent, I tried everything to help him. I finally found him a dog wheelchair.

That was the moment when Rugby’s life changed for the better. Rugby took to his new wheelchair like a duck on water. His enthusiasm and zest for life grew with each passing day. Little did I know that Rugby’s injury and recovery would change my life for the better too.

As we dealt with Rugby’s handicap, I became acutely aware of the interactions between Rugby and those who came in contact with him. Sometimes, there were disapproving and unkind comments that came our way. When this happened I became mesmerized by the effect that Rugby’s antics and friendly personality had on people. He possessed an innate ability to turn negative into positive and criticism into approval.

Those who had scorned the dog in the wheelchair and the woman at the end of the leash did about faces after he approached them with his heartwarming antics. It was as though he spoke their language. “Why are you staring at me? I’m fine. So what if I need a wheelchair to get around? Is your body perfect? Mine isn’t. Please be nice to me. I will be nice to you. I am a very happy dog. I love my wheelchair and I love my life. Don’t you want to be my friend? I sure want to be your friend.”

I have been sharing Rugby’s uplifting story because it is one of encouragement for people who must deal with any adversity. Rugby exemplifies the fact that life is what you make it.

As I speak and write about Rugby’s antics, actions and reactions to people and events, children are delighted. Maybe it is because my words are straight from the horse’s mouth or more accurately straight from Rugby’s mouth.

With my help, Rugby shares his message that teaches hope, courage, understanding, compassion and kindness.

Rugby Jones is my hero and I am confident that he will be your hero too.

Our Mission: Spread Kindness, Acceptance, Respect

The character of Rugby Jones, this site and the books, The “Tail” of Rugby Jones: A Rascal’s Journey from Disability to Ability and The Diary of a Different Dog – Rugby Jones are based on the true story of Claudia Broome’s extraordinary Pembroke Welsh Corgi named Rugby Jones.

Claudia Broome is a noted motivational speaker, author, and coach who shares the incredibly uplifting, heartwarming and motivational story about her beloved dog Rugby Jones, who lost the use of his hind legs in a terrible accident.

Claudia decided to write Rugby’s adventures from his own point of view and with children of all ages in mind, especially those who struggle with any “different-ness” that can set them apart from others.

Using Rugby as an example, Claudia teaches children the value of accepting and respecting diversity and offering kindness to everyone. She gives encouragement to everyone who must live with and overcome the pain of any adversity.

Rugby and his wheelchair Zoomie could just as easily be any person in a wheelchair, any person who suffers from obesity, any person who is mentally challenged or any person with a life-threatening illness whose world is his bed.
His Can Do attitude goes far beyond what the adult world calls disability. For Rugby, it is all about ability, the ability to live every day fully regardless of his particular circumstance.

The books and this site are written in Rugby Jones’ lovably-cocky young voice.

He lives with a “can do” attitude and because of that he has become an example of the fact that life is what each of us makes it. Rugby Jones offers a convincing message to everyone who reads, listens or watches him make his way through the ups and downs of life. That message is based on acceptance, respect, kindness, belief, courage and a positive attitude. Rugby’s heartwarming and humorous narrative is filled with hope and understanding as he shares his earnest lessons on life.

Guess what? Rugby just might be your hero if you give him the chance.

Through her speeches, workshops and coaching, Claudia Broome, is on a mission to spread kindness, acceptance and understanding and ultimately help to stamp out bullying. Her speeches couple the importance of love and support from families with lessons that teach how to identify and remove the power from bullies.

Says Broome, “The hundreds of parents and kids who have connected with me via www.rugbyjones.com regarding their own experiences have provided me with the expertise to see what works and what doesn’t when it comes to bullying.”

Claudia is well received by all who hear her message because she knows the facts and entertains her audiences.  She offers positive ways that children and adults can transform the atmosphere in a school into a climate that cultivates compassion and kindness.

To schedule Claudia to speak to you or your group, and for rates, please email request to claudia@rugbyjones.com and place ***Speaking*** on the subject line.

Believe It! Achieve it!

believe it“Believe it and you will achieve it,” says one parent. “Don’t try because you may fail,” says another. Still another says, “You can’t do that.” And another says, “You are different and you won’t be able to succeed.” Yet another says, “You have a handicap but you can accomplish anything if you believe you can!”

What kind of parent are you? Time for some soul searching here!

Are you the kind of parent who compliments your child for anything and everything? If you are, you are not helping your child because he or she doesn’t believe you or your false compliments.

Maybe you are the kind of parent who tells your child that he or she “can’t” when the child tries? If you are that kind of parent, your child will assume that he or she shouldn’t be confident.

Are you the kind of parent who is honest with your child? Because you believe in your child’s abilities and you help your child learn how to accomplish goals through work, perseverance and discipline. An example of this kind of parenting is Stash Serafin’s mother and how she helped her blind child succeed.

Believe It! Achieve it!

“In the middle of the vortex is the eye of the storm. There’s a stillness and a quiet in there. The eye of the storm is the real metaphor of my life,” he said. “If you can’t see, you might as well do the things your mom taught you in the little circle.”

The little circle has been Serafin’s safe haven since his childhood on a four-acre farm in Blue Bell.

“It all started with a little circle my mom would do on the front lawn,” he said. “She would put acorns in her pockets. She’d say, ‘Catch me if you can,’ and start running. I would hear the acorns rattle and I would chase her. She’d start with a small circle around me, then make it bigger and bigger. Eventually, her circle became the whole front lawn.

“I must have incorporated that when I started skating,” he said. “I would work in a little tiny area and never leave that area until I felt comfortable about where I was.”

Looking back over a half-century to his childhood, he still draws strength from it to navigate through his blindness.

“The thing my family did was, they just assumed I was going to be a regular kid, so they . . . let me do whatever I could do,” he said. “I learned to climb trees. I don’t know how. I just did.

Believe it! Achieve it!

My parents were always supportive about my skating though they felt uncomfortable that I was the only blind skater in the world with little support from any organizations. They were always proud of me. I passed figure tests, dance, and free style tests — All with flying colors and high marks. ”

In a 2007 memoir, A Skating Life: My Story, the Olympian Dorothy Hamill said she was “moved to tears by Stash’s courageous performance” at a show in Wilmington in the 1970s.

“He didn’t let his blindness stop him from expressing his passion on the ice,” Hamill wrote, adding that Serafin stirred her to teach ice skating to children from the Los Angeles School for the Blind.

Competitively, Serafin won an artistic solo gold medal for his figure skating routine at the 2014 Gay Games 9 in Cleveland, interpreting his own musical composition, “I Don’t See You But I Sense You.”

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Differences Make Life Interesting

People worry about differences. Animals just deal with differences in the best way possible. This is Lucy and she has only three legs… not four.

She had an accident when she was a puppy and lost her fourth leg. Is she feeling sorry for herself? Is she worrying about her future and what her life be like with only three legs? NO! Lucy is waking up each morning and facing the new day with a positive attitude. Why? Because she gets it. Lucy gets that life is what we make it and differences are not the focus! Things happen. Good and and bad happens but we have a choice. We can live our lives with gusto and happiness or we can spend our lives feeling sorry for ourselves because we were dealt a bad hand. We can focus on what others have and what others can do or we can focus on life and all that it has to offer!

What a waste it is to teach children the message that they are not the same or that they have less than other kids. Wouldn’t it be better to teach them that everyone is different? That everyone has more or less than they do? That everyone comes from a different place and everyone has an issue? Wouldn’t it be better to teach them that color, race, religion, and every other difference is just that? A Difference and not a bad thing?

Think about it. Think about your own problems. Think about what problems others have and what is happening in the world today. Then… think about Lucy! Think about how she deals with adversity and how she faces each day.

Maybe… just maybe… you might begin to understand what Lucy, the three legged dog understands. Accept differences and embrace differences! Welcome everyone who is different because they may be the very ones who change your life for the better!

Enjoy Rugby Jones? Please spread the word :)

Enjoy this blog? Please spread the word :)